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How this war began is uncertain, but I think there are three factors involved that brought about the tension:

During that time both the clan of Danaan and the clan of the Brancotti were uprooted from their homeland and had to become settled elsewhere, this was one of the causes.

The sun was eclipsed also during this time, as occasionally happens, mostly due to pride on the part of Danaan; this was the second catalyst.

And there was also a volcanic eruption in the land of the Brancotti clan, which didn’t help matters either. All these hardships came upon them and helped to account for the war which broke out.

I believe the truest reason for the quarrel, though perhaps least evident in what was said at the time, was the pride and stubborn willfulness on the sides of both clans. And to show this, I shall present the speeches made by both sides both before and during the war.

Danaan:

You have so much confidence in your own government and society that you fail to see what is going on around you. It is true that the evidence for the tension was minute, but it is strange that you did not catch the warning signs. Our seers warned you of the volcanic eruption, would that you have followed our advice and taken action before the eruption took place. But you are blind, and so full of yourself that you couldn’t see what was happening before your very eyes.

Brancotti:

You are too quick to accuse, accusations are for enemies, not friends. A rebuke would be more suitable for a friend; we are friends, are we not? Do not say we would be too prideful to take a rebuke, you must remember, Danaan, that you have rebuked us many times before and we have taken it well. You gave only slight hints by your seers that the eruption was coming, would that you have told us straight out what was the matter so we could have acted accordingly. But you did not; you resorted to hints and faint tremors; that was foolish.

Danaan:

Would you have listened if our seers had spoken plainly? Or would your allies just have gone to war with us? You must remember that your allies are very loyal and would not hesitate to stand up in your defense; this, we feared, and so acted accordingly. Tensions were already mounting when the eruption began beneath the surface, and our seers did not wish to speak plainly for fear of speeding the eruption. We are both great countries and have been allies for many years, but our downfall will be our pride. Let us resolve this here and now.

Brancotti:

Have we ever failed to listen to you, sister Danaan? I fear all our diplomacy will be in vain if you fail to see that we are not to blame. Why do you keep heaping accusations on us? What have we done wrong?

Danaan:

We fought together when great Persia came against us, but then you did not respect our land boundaries when we have defeated our common enemy and were at peace. We had agreed on the boundaries long ago. We, the people of Danaan, have respected our side of the agreement while you have failed to respect your own agreement.

Brancotti:

We have never failed such an agreement. Have we not always been there for you, sister Danaan? Whenever you were in trouble, did we not come to your aid? Whenever there was sickness in your land, did we not send the best of our physicians? We have built an empire together, uniting many Greek cities for one common cause. What has dissolved such an alliance?

Danaan:

The alliance had been dissolving long ago, beginning when your ambassadors said things to us that we warned you never to say. This has been a battle of diplomacy and words, be careful lest it become a full-out war.

Brancotti:

Is that what you want?—War? To dissolve the alliance? We have ever treated you with respect and honor; there is no action on our part that can merit such harshness from you. Why do you accuse us? What is your reason?

Danaan:

Let us go back to the place it was, or let us move on. You must choose new ambassadors and new words. We have warned you and warn you yet again not to say such things to us, it is not suitable. Your words are not right or well if this alliance is to be kept. Change your ways, and the peace treaty of the past few years will remain. Let your ambassadors continue on in their present manner, and all treaties will fail. It’s your choice.

Brancotti:

Then they will fail. Farewell, Danaan.

The war between the Danaan and the Brancotti, involving no allies but only those who were passive and sought peace, began when all communication ceased between them, except through heralds, and they made war without intermission from then on, though it was a silent one which neither side tried to draw allies into or force friends to take a side on.

Civil war brought many hardships to the cities, and such will always happen as long as human nature remains the same. In peace and prosperity, all are like-minded (for no one is displeased in the way things are going). In such peaceful times, no one has to say anything against their will or in such a way that will undermine their own pride. But strife and disagreements are a true furnace, for they brings all impurities to the surface and show human nature for what it really is.

Both parties were blind, neither understanding the other. The Brancotti did not understand the land boundaries or why they were being accused of crossing them, and the Danaan were angry because they thought they had made themselves clear on multiple occasions as to what could and could not be said. Reconciliation became a long process, and finally it snapped; and this was the start of the war.

This accounting was written up in an orderly fashion, by the summer and winter seasons. The war itself shall not be described, for there’s not much to say. And so, I say farewell.

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